News

Today the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) approved the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint, a move we believe will lead to the loss of 30,000 US jobs, lower wages throughout the wireless industry, and higher prices for consumers. The DOJ did not listen to our concerns, and the deal does not include any job protections. However, the merger is NOT a done deal.

The FCC chairman recently recommended approval of the T-Mobile/Sprint merger. But this isn’t the end of it by any stretch.

There was big news Tuesday in the T-Mobile/Sprint merger review process. We've been saying for months now that the merger will hurt workers and consumers.

Last week was a big week for wireless workers. We were proud to travel to Washington, DC, to represent T-Mobile workers and to talk to regulators and members of Congress about the impact of a proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger.

If you're like us, you've been hearing tons of rumors about the proposed merger between T-Mobile and Sprint. What we really need right now are facts about this deal. So our union, CWA, has put together a website, TMobileSprintFacts.org, that shows just how negative the impact would be on workers and consumers if the merger were approved.

As we prepare for another year of building our union, let’s take a look back at all we accomplished last year.

We began 2018 with the publication of our Wireless Industry Statement of Principles. It’s our vision of what jobs in the wireless industry should look like, drafted by wireless workers from AT&T Mobility, T-Mobile, and Verizon Wireless.

By Ado Wilhelm, Campaign Director, “We Expect Better”

Last month about 300 people attended a forum in Germany where representatives of workers at Deutsche Telekom (DT) confronted executives, including CEO Tim Höttges, about unfair workplace practices at its subsidiary T-Mobile US (TMUS).

As front-line workers in retail sales and call centers, and as telecommunications technicians, we are concerned that the proposed merger between T-Mobile and Sprint will mean the loss of many American jobs, cuts in wages and commissions, and a corresponding reduction in quality to our customers.

By Maritza Lara of Laredo, TX

Last month, I had the pleasure of joining dozens of other telecom workers from T-Mobile, AT&T Mobility (ATTM), Verizon Wireless (VZW), and other companies across the world in a TeleTown Hall. We talked about our common challenges and strategies for building a better future for the wireless industry.

T-Mobile and Sprint announced their intention to merge, with T-Mobile paying Sprint $26 billion and keeping control of the proposed new corporation in the hands of T-Mobile CEO John Legere.

At the Forum of the Deutsche Telekom's Works Councils on November 16, this year's guest speaker, the chair of the German Trade Union Confederation (DGB) Reiner Hoffmann, addressed the situation at T-Mobile US.

He received a lot of applause for his comment that what is happening at T-Mobile US cannot be tolerated. The situation is absolutely clear, Hoffmann said: "We expect better!". In a globalized economy, the company is responsible for good working conditions and compliance with workers' rights of its employees not only in Germany, but also abroad.