News

Today the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) approved the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint, a move we believe will lead to the loss of 30,000 US jobs, lower wages throughout the wireless industry, and higher prices for consumers. The DOJ did not listen to our concerns, and the deal does not include any job protections. However, the merger is NOT a done deal.

The FCC chairman recently recommended approval of the T-Mobile/Sprint merger. But this isn’t the end of it by any stretch.

There was big news Tuesday in the T-Mobile/Sprint merger review process. We've been saying for months now that the merger will hurt workers and consumers.

Greg Caron is a 14-year veteran T-Mobile employee who recently decided it was time to take action as major changes threatened to devalue skilled positions at the company. Back in May Greg attended a town hall meeting at the T-Mobile call center in Colorado Springs where Vice President Callie Fields explained the transition to Team of Experts (TEX) customer care call center units. Callie told the crowd at the meeting that there was a strong possibility that Specialized Technical Care (STC) would be outsourced or dissolved and rolled into TEX.

Our partners at ver.di, Germany’s second-largest labor union and the union representing workers at T-Mobile parent company Deutsche Telekom (DT), are helping to build solidarity with our co-workers in Germany.

From Zagreb, Croatia, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, union members around the world are demanding dignity for T-Mobile US employees. At a conference in Zagreb in June, the information technology and telecommunications workers of UNI Europa ICTS unanimously backed our demand that the company respect our right to organize our union.

We've all read the headlines: T-Mobile and Sprint are talking merger . . . again. Sprint is notorious for outsourcing good call center jobs to low-wage contractors in and outside of the United States, cutting its workforce by more than 50 percent in the past 11 years, and exporting thousands of jobs to the Philippines, Mexico, India, and other countries. So what action can we take to protect ourselves?

We're pleased to report that earlier this month, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed 11 guilty findings in a case arguing that many rules in the T-Mobile handbook are illegal. The court also found T-Mobile guilty of maintaining a rule that unlawfully bans all types of recordings in the workplace. This confirms that the rule in our employee handbook prohibiting employees from using their phones to take photographs or to make audio or video recordings without permission from a supervisor or manager is not legal.

CWA members at AT&T Mobility in 36 states are fighting for a fair contract right now. In May, TU members stood shoulder-to-shoulder with tens of thousands of CWA members from AT&T Mobility across the United States when they struck for three days.